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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2019


I develop and test theoretical hypotheses for how employees' authenticity at work influences their motivational, relational, and effectiveness outcomes. These hypotheses are grounded in the idea that when individuals feel they display their true selves at work, they can more fully employ their physical, cognitive and emotional energies in their work roles, which in turn leads to higher levels of employee effectiveness (e.g., task performance, perceived value to the organization, and promotability). In addition to this personal motivational process, individuals who are more authentic also develop high-quality relationships with their coworkers, thereby receiving more instrumental support and minimizing the antagonistic …

Contributors
Buckman, Brooke R., LePine, Jeffery, Peterson, Suzanne, et al.
Created Date
2014

Using experience, observations, data, current research, and writings in the field of volunteer management, it was determined there was a need to study the effects of leadership/management practices on the productivity outcomes of a volunteer construction workforce. A simple wood bench that would be tiled and painted was designed to test the areas of Time, Waste, Quality, Safety, and Satisfaction of different volunteer groups. The challenge was bolstered by giving the teams no power tools and limited available resources. A simple design of experiment model was used to test highs and lows in the three management techniques of Instruction, Help, …

Contributors
Prigge V, Diedrich, Sullivan, Kenneth, Wiezel, Avi, et al.
Created Date
2013

Harm to patients remains high in US hospitals despite significant progress to improve the quality of care in our health systems. Leadership, a culture of patient safety, and a climate conducive to innovation in patient care are necessary to advance positive patient safety outcomes. Yet, little is known about how leadership can impact patient safety within a climate of innovation. This study examines the effects of transformational and transactional leadership (singularly and with transactional augmenting transformational leadership) as related to nurses’ perception of patient safety, how communication elements of a culture of patient safety may strengthen that relationship, and how …

Contributors
Younger, Samuel, Larkey, Linda, Porter O'Grady, Timothy, et al.
Created Date
2019

Knowledge advancement occurs when the creation of new and useful knowledge encompasses and supersedes earlier knowledge. A rapidly growing number of scholars with state-of-the-art research tools has led to the growth of knowledge exploration in almost every field. It, however, has been observed that the findings of new studies frequently differ from previously established evidence and even disagree with one another. Conflicting and contradictory results prevail in the literature. This phenomenon has puzzled many people with respect to which findings are reliable and which should be considered as valid. Inconclusive results in the literature inhibit, rather than facilitate, knowledge advancement …

Contributors
Hung, Chia-Ko, Hager, Mark, Lecy, Jesse, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this study is to explore the way mindfulness informs how leaders make sense of and navigate paradoxical tensions that arise in their organizations. This study employs a qualitative research methodology, based on synchronous, semi- structured, in-depth interviews of leaders who hold a personal mindfulness practice. Qualitative interviews illuminate how leaders’ communication about paradoxical tensions (e.g., through metaphorical language) reflects the way they experience those tensions. Findings extend the constitutive approach to paradox by demonstrating the way mindfulness informs awareness, emotion, pausing, and self-care. Specifically, this study (1) empirically illustrates how higher-level, dialogic more-than responses to paradox may …

Contributors
Town, Sophia, Tracy, Sarah, Fairhurst, Gail, et al.
Created Date
2019

This dissertation examines an analytical methodology that considers predictive maintenance on industrial facilities equipment to exceed world class availability standards with greater understanding for organizational participation impacts. The research for this study was performed at one of the world's largest semiconductor facilities, with the intent of understanding one possible cause for a noticeable behavior in technical work routines. Semiconductor manufacturing disruption poses significant potential revenue loss on a scale easily quantified in millions of dollars per hour. These instances are commonly referred to as "Interruption to production" (ITP). ITP is a standardized metric used across Company ABC's worldwide factory network …

Contributors
Mcdonald, Doug, Sullivan, Kenneth, Badger, William, et al.
Created Date
2012

Achieving high performance is a crucial issue in modern organizations including public, for-profit, and nonprofit even though there is no consensus about what performance means. How to obtain resources is important for boosting organizational performance. Furthermore, resource acquisition capacity is closely associated with the survival of modern nonprofit organizations. Resource Dependence Theory (RDT) notes that dependence on critical resources influences diverse actions and behavior of organizations. The study examines the relationship among Resource Dependence Patterns (RDPs), organizational behavior, and organizational performance in nonprofit organizations. This study introduces five dimensions of RDPs (the appearance of the resource inflow): resource dependency, resource …

Contributors
Seo, Jungwook, Cayer, N.Joseph, Lan, G. Zhiyong, et al.
Created Date
2011

This dissertation develops grounded theory on how respect is received and internalized in organizations, and the personal and work-related outcomes of receiving respect. A company that employed inmates at a state prison to perform professional business-to-business marketing services provided a unique context for data collection, as respect is typically problematic in a prison environment but was deliberately instilled by this particular company. Data collection took place in three call centers (minimum, medium, and maximum security levels) and included extensive non-participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and archival documents. My sampling strategy focused on the experience of new employees as they went through …

Contributors
Rogers, Kristie M, Ashforth, Blake E, Corley, Kevin G, et al.
Created Date
2012

Research suggests that behaving in an ingratiatory manner towards one’s supervisor is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, ingratiation is a powerful tool through which employees develop positive social exchange relationships with target audiences (i.e., supervisors) and subsequently obtain desired outcomes at work. On the other hand, third party observers of ingratiation often view this behavior (and the people enacting it) in a negative manner, thereby hindering ingratiatory employees’ ability to develop high quality social exchange relationships with these individuals. However, this research primarily focuses on how organizational actors perceive of ingratiatory employees while neglecting the social context in …

Contributors
Kim, Ji Koung, LePine, Jeffery A, Zhang, Zhen, et al.
Created Date
2019

After decades of dormancy, character is re-emerging as an important research topic among organizational leadership researchers in response to the need to better explain the source of certain exemplary and ethical leader performance (Hannah & Avolio, 2011; Leonard, 1997; Thompson & Riggio, 2010; Wright & Goodstein, 2007). However, efforts to operationalize character are criticized for their abstract and idealistic trait-based conceptualizations that fail to capture the reality of leadership and situational dynamics (Conger & Hollenbeck, 2010). The purpose of this study is to develop a more robust theoretical approach to character that is empirically grounded in the real life complexities …

Contributors
Jennings, Peter Land, Corley, Kevin, Waldman, David, et al.
Created Date
2013