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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


Mathematical modeling of infectious diseases can help public health officials to make decisions related to the mitigation of epidemic outbreaks. However, over or under estimations of the morbidity of any infectious disease can be problematic. Therefore, public health officials can always make use of better models to study the potential implication of their decisions and strategies prior to their implementation. Previous work focuses on the mechanisms underlying the different epidemic waves observed in Mexico during the novel swine origin influenza H1N1 pandemic of 2009 and showed extensions of classical models in epidemiology by adding temporal variations in different parameters that ...

Contributors
Cruz-Aponte, Maytee, Wirkus, Stephen A., Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2014

The primary focus of this dissertation lies in extremal combinatorics, in particular intersection theorems in finite set theory. A seminal result in the area is the theorem of Erdos, Ko and Rado which finds the upper bound on the size of an intersecting family of subsets of an n-element set and characterizes the structure of families which attain this upper bound. A major portion of this dissertation focuses on a recent generalization of the Erdos--Ko--Rado theorem which considers intersecting families of independent sets in graphs. An intersection theorem is proved for a large class of graphs, namely chordal graphs which ...

Contributors
Kamat, Vikram Mahendra, Hurlbert, Glenn, Colbourn, Charles, et al.
Created Date
2011

Higher-rank graphs, or k-graphs, are higher-dimensional analogues of directed graphs, and as with ordinary directed graphs, there are various C*-algebraic objects that can be associated with them. This thesis adopts a functorial approach to study the relationship between k-graphs and their associated C*-algebras. In particular, two functors are given between appropriate categories of higher-rank graphs and the category of C*-algebras, one for Toeplitz algebras and one for Cuntz-Krieger algebras. Additionally, the Cayley graphs of finitely generated groups are used to define a class of k-graphs, and a functor is then given from a category of finitely generated groups to the ...

Contributors
Eikenberry, Keenan, Quigg, John, Kaliszewski, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2016

Nonlinear dispersive equations model nonlinear waves in a wide range of physical and mathematics contexts. They reinforce or dissipate effects of linear dispersion and nonlinear interactions, and thus, may be of a focusing or defocusing nature. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation or NLS is an example of such equations. It appears as a model in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, quantum condensates, heat pulses in solids and various other nonlinear instability phenomena. In mathematics, one of the interests is to look at the wave interaction: waves propagation with different speeds and/or different directions produces either small perturbations comparable with linear behavior, or creates ...

Contributors
Guevara, Cristi Darley, Roudenko, Svetlana, Castillo_Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2011

A moving overlapping mesh methodology that achieves spectral accuracy in space and up to second-order accuracy in time is developed for solution of unsteady incompressible flow equations in three-dimensional domains. The targeted applications are in aerospace and mechanical engineering domains and involve problems in turbomachinery, rotary aircrafts, wind turbines and others. The methodology is built within the dual-session communication framework initially developed for stationary overlapping meshes. The methodology employs semi-implicit spectral element discretization of equations in each subdomain and explicit treatment of subdomain interfaces with spectrally-accurate spatial interpolation and high-order accurate temporal extrapolation, and requires few, if any, iterations, yet ...

Contributors
Merrill, Brandon Earl, Peet, Yulia, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2016

In the 1980's, Gromov and Piatetski-Shapiro introduced a technique called "hybridization'' which allowed them to produce non-arithmetic hyperbolic lattices from two non-commensurable arithmetic lattices. It has been asked whether an analogous hybridization technique exists for complex hyperbolic lattices, because certain geometric obstructions make it unclear how to adapt this technique. This thesis explores one possible construction (originally due to Hunt) in depth and uses it to produce arithmetic lattices, non-arithmetic lattices, and thin subgroups in SU(2,1). Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Wells, Joseph, Paupert, Julien, Kotschwar, Brett, et al.
Created Date
2019

Toward the ambitious long-term goal of a fleet of cooperating Flexible Autonomous Machines operating in an uncertain Environment (FAME), this thesis addresses various control objectives for ground vehicles. There are two main objectives within this thesis, first is the use of visual information to control a Differential-Drive Thunder Tumbler (DDTT) mobile robot and second is the solution to a minimum time optimal control problem for the robot around a racetrack. One method to do the first objective is by using the Position Based Visual Servoing (PBVS) approach in which a camera looks at a target and the position of the ...

Contributors
Aldaco Lopez, Jesus, Rodriguez, Armando A., Artemiadis, Panagiotis K., et al.
Created Date
2016

The Quantum Harmonic Oscillator is one of the most important models in Quantum Mechanics. Analogous to the classical mass vibrating back and forth on a spring, the quantum oscillator system has attracted substantial attention over the years because of its importance in many advanced and difficult quantum problems. This dissertation deals with solving generalized models of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation which are called generalized quantum harmonic oscillators, and these are characterized by an arbitrary quadratic Hamiltonian of linear momentum and position operators. The primary challenge in this work is that most quantum models with timedependence are not solvable explicitly, yet ...

Contributors
Lopez, Raquel, Suslov, Sergei K, Radunskaya, Ami, et al.
Created Date
2012

In 2007, Arizona voters passed House Bill (HB) 2064, a law that fundamentally restructured the Structured English Immersion (SEI) program, putting into place a 4-hour English language development (ELD) block for educating English language learners (ELLs). Under this new language policy, ELL students are segregated from their English-speaking peers to receive a minimum of four hours of instruction in discrete language skills with no contextual or native language support. Furthermore, ELD is separate from content-area instruction, meaning that language and mathematics are taught as two separate entities. While educators and researchers have begun to examine the organizational structure of the ...

Contributors
Llamas-Flores, Silvia, Middleton, James, Battey, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2013

In any instructional situation, the instructor's goal is to maximize the learning attained by students. Drawing on the adage, 'we learn best what we have taught,' this action research project was conducted to examine whether students, in fact, learned college algebra material better if they taught it to their peers. The teaching-to-learn process was conducted in the following way. The instructor-researcher met with individual students and taught a college algebra topic to a student who served as the leader of a group of four students. At the next step, the student who originally learned the material from the instructor met ...

Contributors
Nicoloff, Stephen James, Buss, Ray R, Zambo, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2011