Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Doctoral Dissertation
Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


This dissertation studies load balancing algorithms for many-server systems (with N servers) and focuses on the steady-state performance of load balancing algorithms in the heavy traffic regime. The framework of Stein’s method and (iterative) state-space collapse (SSC) are used to analyze three load balancing systems: 1) load balancing in the Sub-Halfin-Whitt regime with exponential service time; 2) load balancing in the Beyond-Halfin-Whitt regime with exponential service time; 3) load balancing in the Sub-Halfin-Whitt regime with Coxian-2 service time. When in the Sub-Halfin-Whitt regime, the sufficient conditions are established such that any load balancing algorithm that satisfies the conditions have both …

Contributors
Liu, Xin, Ying, Lei, Maguluri, Siva Theja, et al.
Created Date
2019

This dissertation addresses access management problems that occur in both emergency and outpatient clinics with the objective of allocating the available resources to improve performance measures by considering the trade-offs. Two main settings are considered for estimating patient willingness-to-wait (WtW) behavior for outpatient appointments with statistical analyses of data: allocation of the limited booking horizon to patients of different priorities by using time windows in an outpatient setting considering patient behavior, and allocation of hospital beds to admitted Emergency Department (ED) patients. For each chapter, a different approach based on the problem context is developed and the performance is analyzed …

Contributors
Kilinc, Derya, Gel, Esma, Pasupathy, Kalyan, et al.
Created Date
2019

The analysis of clinical workflow offers many challenges to clinical stakeholders and researchers, especially in environments characterized by dynamic and concurrent processes. Workflow analysis in such environments is essential for monitoring performance and finding bottlenecks and sources of error. Clinical workflow analysis has been enhanced with the inclusion of modern technologies. One such intervention is automated location tracking which is a system that detects the movement of clinicians and equipment. Utilizing the data produced from automated location tracking technologies can lead to the development of novel workflow analytics that can be used to complement more traditional approaches such as ethnography …

Contributors
Vankipuram, Akshay, Patel, Vimla L, Wang, Dongwen, et al.
Created Date
2018

Optimization of on-demand transportation systems and ride-sharing services involves solving a class of complex vehicle routing problems with pickup and delivery with time windows (VRPPDTW). Previous research has made a number of important contributions to the challenging pickup and delivery problem along different formulation or solution approaches. However, there are a number of modeling and algorithmic challenges for a large-scale deployment of a vehicle routing and scheduling algorithm, especially for regional networks with various road capacity and traffic delay constraints on freeway bottlenecks and signal timing on urban streets. The main thrust of this research is constructing hyper-networks to implicitly …

Contributors
Mahmoudi, Monirehalsadat, Zhou, Xuesong, Mirchandani, Pitu B, et al.
Created Date
2018

When preparing for and responding to disasters, humanitarian organizations must run effective and efficient supply chains to deliver the resources needed by the affected population. The management of humanitarian supply chains include coordinating the flows of goods, finances, and information. This dissertation examines how humanitarian organizations can improve the distribution of information, which is critical for the planning and coordination of the other two flows. Specifically, I study the diffusion of information on social media platforms since such platforms have emerged as useful communication tools for humanitarian organizations during times of crisis. In the first chapter, I identify several factors …

Contributors
Yoo, Eunae, Rabinovich, Elliot, Gu, Bin, et al.
Created Date
2018

Project portfolio selection (PPS) is a significant problem faced by most organizations. How to best select the many innovative ideas that a company has developed to deploy in a proper and sustained manner with a balanced allocation of its resources over multiple time periods is one of vital importance to a company's goals. This dissertation details the steps involved in deploying a more intuitive portfolio selection framework that facilitates bringing analysts and management to a consensus on ongoing company efforts and buy into final decisions. A binary integer programming selection model that constructs an efficient frontier allows the evaluation of …

Contributors
Sampath, Siddhartha, Gel, Esma, Fowler, Jown W, et al.
Created Date
2018

The uncertainty and variability associated with stochastic resources, such as wind and solar, coupled with the stringent reliability requirements and constantly changing system operating conditions (e.g., generator and transmission outages) introduce new challenges to power systems. Contemporary approaches to model reserve requirements within the conventional security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) models may not be satisfactory with increasing penetration levels of stochastic resources; such conventional models pro-cure reserves in accordance with deterministic criteria whose deliverability, in the event of an uncertain realization, is not guaranteed. Smart, well-designed reserve policies are needed to assist system operators in maintaining reliability at least cost. Contemporary …

Contributors
Singhal, Nikita Ghanshyam, Hedman, Kory W, Vittal, Vijay, et al.
Created Date
2018

One of the greatest 21st century challenges is meeting the needs of a growing world population expected to increase 35% by 2050 given projected trends in diets, consumption and income. This in turn requires a 70-100% improvement on current production capability, even as the world is undergoing systemic climate pattern changes. This growth not only translates to higher demand for staple products, such as rice, wheat, and beans, but also creates demand for high-value products such as fresh fruits and vegetables (FVs), fueled by better economic conditions and a more health conscious consumer. In this case, it would seem that …

Contributors
Flores, Hector M., Villalobos, Rene, Pan, Rong, et al.
Created Date
2017

This research develops heuristics to manage both mandatory and optional network capacity reductions to better serve the network flows. The main application discussed relates to transportation networks, and flow cost relates to travel cost of users of the network. Temporary mandatory capacity reductions are required by maintenance activities. The objective of managing maintenance activities and the attendant temporary network capacity reductions is to schedule the required segment closures so that all maintenance work can be completed on time, and the total flow cost over the maintenance period is minimized for different types of flows. The goal of optional network capacity …

Contributors
Peng, Dening, Mirchandani, Pitu B, Sefair, Jorge, et al.
Created Date
2017

While agency problems inevitably exist in buyer-supplier relationships, the focus on how to overcome such problems has been confined to the buyer-supplier dyad as if the dyad exists in isolation. In this dissertation, I re-frame the agency problems beyond the dyadic relationship between a buyer and its supplier and suggest a new way to overcome agency problems. While the current Agency Theory suggests that the buyer can monitor and provide incentives to mitigate the agency problems, I propose to look beyond the dyad in addressing buyer-supplier agency problems. In the first chapter, I examine the impact of the “indirect links” …

Contributors
Yang, Yang, Choi, Thomas Y, Carter, Craig, et al.
Created Date
2016