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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2012 2019


Most of the sunlight powering natural photosynthesis is absorbed by antenna arrays that transfer, and regulate the delivery of excitation energy to reaction centers in the chloroplast where photosynthesis takes place. Under intense sunlight the plants and certain organisms cannot fully utilize all of the sunlight received by antennas and excess redox species are formed which could potentially harm them. To prevent this, excess energy is dissipated by antennas before it reaches to the reaction centers to initiate electron transfer needed in the next steps of photosynthesis. This phenomenon is called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). The mechanism of NPQ is not …

Contributors
Bhushan, Kul, Gust, Devens, Moore, Ana, et al.
Created Date
2012

A clean and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels is solar energy. For efficient use of solar energy to be realized, artificial systems that can effectively capture and convert sunlight into a usable form of energy have to be developed. In natural photosynthesis, antenna chlorophylls and carotenoids capture sunlight and transfer the resulting excitation energy to the photosynthetic reaction center (PRC). Small reorganization energy, λ and well-balanced electronic coupling between donors and acceptors in the PRC favor formation of a highly efficient charge-separated (CS) state. By covalently linking electron/energy donors to acceptors, organic molecular dyads and triads that mimic natural photosynthesis …

Contributors
Arero, Jaro, Gust, Devens, Moore, Ana, et al.
Created Date
2014

Metalloporphyrins represent a class of molecular electrocatalysts for driving energy relevant half-reactions, including hydrogen evolution and carbon dioxide reduction. As electrocatalysts, they provide a strategy, and potential structural component, for linking renewable energy sources with the production of fuels and other value-added chemicals. In this work, porphyrins are used as structural motifs for exploring structure-function relationships in electrocatalysis and as molecular building blocks for assembling photoelectrochemical assemblies leveraging the light capture and conversion properties of a gallium phosphide (GaP) semiconductor. These concepts are further covered in Chapter 1. A direct one-step method to chemically graft metalloporphyrins to GaP surfaces is …

Contributors
Khusnutdinova, Diana, Moore, Gary F., Moore, Ana L., et al.
Created Date
2019

Photochromic molecules, which photoisomerize between two chemically and optically distinct states, are well suited for electron and energy transfer to covalently attached chromophores. This dissertation aims to manipulate electron and energy transfer by photochromic control in a number of organic molecular systems. Herein the synthesis, characterization and function of these organic molecular systems will be described. Electron and energy transfer were quantified by the use of steady state absorbance and fluorescence, as well as time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorbance. A dithienylethene-porphrin-fullerene triad was synthesized to investigate photochromic control of photo-induced electron transfer. Control of two distinct electron transfer pathways was …

Contributors
Crisman, Jeffrey Ray, Gust, John D, Rose, Seth, et al.
Created Date
2014

The search for highly active, inexpensive, and earth abundant replacements for existing transition metal catalysts is ongoing. Our group has utilized several redox non-innocent ligands that feature flexible arms with donor substituents. These ligands allow for coordinative flexibility about the metal centre, while the redox non-innocent core helps to overcome the one electron chemistry that is prevalent in first row transition metals. This dissertation focuses on the use of Ph2PPrDI, which can adopt a κ4-configuration when bound to a metal. One reaction that is industrially useful is hydrosilylation, which allows for the preparation of silicones that are useful in the …

Contributors
Rock, Christopher Lewis, Trovitch, Ryan J, Kouvetakis, John, et al.
Created Date
2018

Organic reactions in natural hydrothermal settings have relevance toward the deep carbon cycle, petroleum formation, the ecology of deep microbial communities, and potentially the origin of life. Many reaction pathways involving organic compounds under geochemically relevant hydrothermal conditions have now been characterized, but their mechanisms, in particular those involving mineral surface catalysis, are largely unknown. The overall goal of this work is to describe these mechanisms so that predictive models of reactivity can be developed and so that applications of these reactions beyond geochemistry can be explored. The focus of this dissertation is the mechanisms of hydrothermal dehydration and catalytic …

Contributors
Bockisch, Christiana, Gould, Ian R, Hartnett, Hilairy E, et al.
Created Date
2018

In many natural systems aqueous geochemical conditions dictate the reaction pathways of organic compounds. Geologic settings that span wide ranges in temperature, pressure, and composition vastly alter relative reaction rates and resulting organic abundances. The dependence of organic reactions on these variables contributes to planetary-scale nutrient cycling, and suggests that relative abundances of organic compounds can reveal information about inaccessible geologic environments, whether from the terrestrial subsurface, remote planetary settings, or even the distant past (if organic abundances are well preserved). Despite their relevance to planetary modeling and exploration, organic reactions remain poorly characterized under geochemically relevant conditions, especially in …

Contributors
Robinson, Kirtland John, Shock, Everett L, Herckes, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2017

Sunlight, the most abundant source of energy available, is diffuse and intermittent; therefore it needs to be stored in chemicals bonds in order to be used any time. Photosynthesis converts sunlight into useful chemical energy that organisms can use for their functions. Artificial photosynthesis aims to use the essential chemistry of natural photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and convert it into fuels such as hydrogen gas. By splitting water, tandem photoelectrochemical solar cells (PESC) can produce hydrogen gas, which can be stored and used as fuel. Understanding the mechanisms of photosynthesis, such as photoinduced electron transfer, proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) …

Contributors
Tejeda Ferrari, Marely Estefania, Moore, Ana, Mujica, Vladimiro, et al.
Created Date
2016

Hydrothermal systems are not the typical environments in which organic chemistry is studied. However the organic reactions happening there are increasingly implicated in non-trivial geochemical processes. For example, the origins of life, the formation and degradation of petroleum, and feeding the deep biosphere. These are environments where water is heated and pressurized until it has a polarity more typical of an organic solvent and an increased dissociation constant that decreases its pH. In addition, these environments host many transition metal oxide and sulfide minerals that are not inert bystanders to the chemistry happening around them. This thesis takes from the …

Contributors
Shipp, Jessie Anita, Hartnett, Hilairy H., Gould, Ian R., et al.
Created Date
2013

Wide spread adoption of photovoltaic technology is limited by cost. Developing photovoltaics based on low-cost materials and processing techniques is one strategy for reducing the cost of electricity generated by photovoltaics. With this in mind, novel porphyrin and porphyrin-fullerene electropolymers have been developed here at Arizona State University. Porphyrins are attractive for inclusion in the light absorbing layer of photovoltaics due to their high absorption coefficients (on the order of 105 cm-1) and porphyrin-fullerene dyads are attractive for use in photovoltaics due to their ability to produce ultrafast photoinduced charge separation (on the order of 10-15 s). The focus of …

Contributors
Bridgewater, James Ward, Gust, Devens, Tao, Nongjian, et al.
Created Date
2014