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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




This document serves as a discussion of and reflection on the collaborative process of rehearsing and performing arrive, create: a Dance made by Many. My intention for the work was to deconstruct the traditional performance paradigm, focusing on constructing a generous performance atmosphere. During the rehearsal process the cast collectively worked to develop an ensemble dynamic for improvisational dance making. The construct of the performance encouraged the audience to engage with the work, both physically and imaginatively through sensory interaction with objects as well as verbal conversation. This document: recalls my background in dance improvisation; explores the relationship of philosophical …

Contributors
Wall-Maclane, Laurel Jasmine, Standley, Eileen, Fitzgerald, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2013

I'll go to the end of time for you (and you don't even know my name) is an evening-length solo performance created and performed by Kristopher K.Q. Pourzal. It premiered November 8-10, 2013 in the Margaret Gisolo Dance Theatre of Arizona State University. The solo was the culmination (suspension, really) of a wild creative journey, the distillation of a process that initially involved several collaborators. Through a series of neurotically/erotically repetitive episodes of self-composed song, text, and dance, the work mines questions of the desire to be seen and the desire to feel alive. The conventions and constructs of the …

Contributors
Pourzal, Kristopher Kareem Quarles, Standley, Eileen, Vissicaro, Pegge, et al.
Created Date
2014

“Mierda.” was an original 50-minute solo dance and theater performance by Jordan Klitzke along with guest artist Gina Jurek that premiered from September 6-8, 2018 at Arizona State University. The creative tools of sensation, presence, and fantasy were applied in the development of an individualized movement vocabulary focused on the artist’s embodiment of contrasting ideas. That research was then further cultivated into an immersive theatrical collage that stimulated relational thinking and heightened consciousness. “Mierda.” was an example of a contemporary creative process that utilized the languages of dance and theater. The performance was a unique continuation of artistic research undertaken …

Contributors
Klitzke, Jordan Alan, Standley, Eileen, Conder, Carley, et al.
Created Date
2018

“shiFT: An Exploration of Empathy” is a document detailing the process of creating the evening length dance performance, “shiFT,” through the theoretical, somatic, kinesthetic and choreographic research of empathy. This research specifically addressed the ability to consciously take on an empathetic perspective and the change that must occur within oneself to co-create empathy. It focused on the factors that impede empathetic function and the role of vulnerability in experiencing empathy. Throughout the creation of this concert, the choreographer employed empathy building exercises and concentrated creative processes constructed from her research into the neurological, emotional and physical aspects of empathy with …

Contributors
Witt, Rebecca Lynn, Fitzgerald, Mary, Standley, Eileen, et al.
Created Date
2018

The integration of yoga into the music curriculum has the potential of offering many immediate and life-long benefits to musicians. Yoga can help address issues such as performance anxiety and musculoskeletal problems, and enhance focus and awareness during musical practice and performance. Although the philosophy of yoga has many similarities to the process of learning a musical instrument, the benefits of yoga for musicians is a topic that has gained attention only recently. This document explores several ways in which the practice and philosophy of yoga can be fused with saxophone pedagogy as one way to prepare students for a …

Contributors
Adams, Allison Dromgold, Norton, Kay, Hill, Gary, et al.
Created Date
2012