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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


This project uses fourteen transcriptions of Pete Fountain’s solos as examples to demonstrate traditional jazz clarinet techniques and language in terms of motives, patterns, and a variety of articulations. This project also includes guidelines on how to practice jazz improvisation as well as how to apply Fountain’s techniques and jazz language to one’s own improvisation. Though there are countless musicians who have made remarkable contributions to the development of the jazz language, Pete Fountain’s unique style is particularly worthy of study due to his massive media presence, effortless playing techniques, unique tone quality, and showmanship throughout his career. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Wu, Shengwen, Spring, Robert, Gardner, Joshua, et al.
Created Date
2019

The percussion jazz ensemble is a long-established yet rare component of 21st century percussion studios in the United States. While many American collegiate programs have percussion ensembles that perform jazz-based pieces, none are identified as a “percussion jazz ensemble.” This may be for a variety of reasons. Professors may not have considered adding a percussion jazz ensemble to their program because of its scarcity in American universities. Including such a class would be challenging if the instructors did not feel comfortable or familiar enough with jazz idioms and vernacular. Additionally, very few compositions or arrangements are available for this group. …

Contributors
Moreau, Danielle, Smith, Jeffrey, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2016