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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Zinc oxide (ZnO) has attracted much interest during last decades as a functional material. Furthermore, ZnO is a potential material for transparent conducting oxide material competing with indium tin oxide (ITO), graphene, and carbon nanotube film. It has been known as a conductive material when doped with elements such as indium, gallium and aluminum. The solubility of those dopant elements in ZnO is still debatable; but, it is necessary to find alternative conducting materials when their form is film or nanostructure for display devices. This is a consequence of the ever increasing price of indium. In addition, a new generation …

Contributors
Choi, Hyung Woo, Alford, Terry L., Krause, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2012

This is a two part thesis: Part – I This part of the thesis involves automation of statistical risk analysis of photovoltaic (PV) power plants. Statistical risk analysis on the field observed defects/failures in the PV power plants is usually carried out using a combination of several manual methods which are often laborious, time consuming and prone to human errors. In order to mitigate these issues, an automated statistical risk analysis (FMECA) is necessary. The automation developed and presented in this project generates about 20 different reliability risk plots in about 3-4 minutes without the need of several manual labor …

Contributors
Moorthy, Mathan Kumar, Govindasamy, Tamizhmani, Devarajan, Srinivasan, et al.
Created Date
2015

A primary motivation of research in photovoltaic technology is to obtain higher efficiency photovoltaic devices at reduced cost of production so that solar electricity can be cost competitive. The majority of photovoltaic technologies are based on p-n junction, with efficiency potential being much lower than the thermodynamic limits of individual technologies and thereby providing substantial scope for further improvements in efficiency. The thesis explores photovoltaic devices using new physical processes that rely on thin layers and are capable of attaining the thermodynamic limit of photovoltaic technology. Silicon heterostructure is one of the candidate technologies in which thin films induce a …

Contributors
Ghosh, Kunal, Bowden, Stuart, Honsberg, Christiana, et al.
Created Date
2011

Potential induced degradation (PID) due to high system voltages is one of the major degradation mechanisms in photovoltaic (PV) modules, adversely affecting their performance due to the combined effects of the following factors: system voltage, superstrate/glass surface conductivity, encapsulant conductivity, silicon nitride anti-reflection coating property and interface property (glass/encapsulant; encapsulant/cell; encapsulant/backsheet). Previous studies carried out at ASU's Photovoltaic Reliability Laboratory (ASU-PRL) showed that only negative voltage bias (positive grounded systems) adversely affects the performance of commonly available crystalline silicon modules. In previous studies, the surface conductivity of the glass surface was obtained using either conductive carbon layer extending from the …

Contributors
Tatapudi, Sai Ravi Vasista, Tamizhmani, Govindasamy, Srinivasan, Devarajan, et al.
Created Date
2012

In order to meet climate targets, the solar photovoltaic industry must increase photovoltaic (PV) deployment and cost competitiveness over its business-as-usual trajectory. This requires more efficient PV modules that use less expensive materials, and longer operational lifetime. The work presented here approaches this challenge with a novel metallization method for solar PV and electronic devices. This document outlines work completed to this end. Chapter 1 introduces the areas for cost reductions and improvements in efficiency to drive down the cost per watt of solar modules. Next, in Chapter 2, conventional and advanced metallization methods are reviewed, and our proposed solution …

Contributors
Jeffries, April Marie, Bertoni, Mariana I, Saive, Rebecca, et al.
Created Date
2019