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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Sexual violence, as defined by the Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network (RAINN), is used as an all-encompassing term to include crimes of sexual assault, rape, and sexual abuse (RAINN, 2016). There are numerous negative impacts of sexual violence on a victim. Victims of sexual violence experience negative health impacts, such as physical injuries from the result of sexual violence and unwanted reproductive consequences, such as the risk of sexually transmitted infections or unwanted pregnancy (Shahali et. al, 2016). They also suffer from long-term psychological impacts, such as long-term emotional trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Reddington & Kriesel, 2005). The …

Contributors
Kim, Grace, Maienschein, Jane, Ellison, Karin, et al.
Created Date
2017

A secondary data analysis was conducted to investigate the direct and indirect effects of family traditionalism, family cohesion, and parent involvement on alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use in a sample of pre-adolescent youth (N = 635) and their parents (N = 462). Aim one hypothesized that family cohesion and family traditionalism would be indicators of a higher order construct, operationalized as familismo. Aims two and three hypothesized that family traditionalism, family cohesion, and parent involvement would be protective against youth substance use. Finally, aim four hypothesized that acculturation would decrease the protective effects of family traditionalism and family cohesion on …

Contributors
Martinez, Marcos Jerome, Marsiglia, Flavio F, Kulis, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2015

Nationally, African Americans suffer disproportionately from diabetes; with 13.2% of African Americans diagnosed with diabetes compared to 7.6% of non-Hispanic whites (CDC, 2014). Nearly one-half of all people with diabetes are non-adherent to their oral medications; adherence to insulin therapy was 60%-80% (Brunton et al., 2011; Cramer, 2004; Rubin, 2005). This study explored the question, "What mechanisms are associated with adherence to diabetes medication, including insulin, for African Americans in the Southwest?" Twenty-three people participated in the study; 17 participated in interviews and six participated in gendered focus groups. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach engaged the African American community …

Contributors
Wardian, Jana, Marsiglia, Flavio F, Sun, Fei, et al.
Created Date
2015

Traumatic events have deleterious effects biologically, emotionally, socially, and cognitively. Events may include violence, neglect, and abuse and are best understood through a lifecourse perspective. Preventable and treatable, traumatic exposure promotes the development of trauma symptoms including avoidance, hyperarousal, increased fear, intrusive experiences, and aggression/violence. Trauma symptomology is thought to be an underlying cause of child maltreatment and intergenerational cycles of abuse/neglect. Traumatic symptoms may interfere with the ability to work, function, and care for young children and may accompany a Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. Although these experiences are known to be harmful, little research has focused on experiences …

Contributors
Kawam, Elisa, Krysik, Judy, Shafer, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2015

Social determinants of health present significant barriers to utilization of maternal health services in transitional countries. This dissertation study examined associations between household autonomy and utilization of prenatal services among women of reproductive age in Armenia and Azerbaijan. Using nationally representative survey data, this study explored if household autonomy of women positively influenced the timing of the first prenatal visit, the number of prenatal care visits, and the content of care during visits. Results showed that household autonomy was positively associated with the timing of the first visit for prenatal care and the number of prenatal care visits. The content …

Contributors
Urbaeva, Zhyldyz, Anderson, Steven, Krysik, Judy, et al.
Created Date
2015