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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2010 2017


Value-added models (VAMs) are used by many states to assess contributions of individual teachers and schools to students' academic growth. The generalized persistence VAM, one of the most flexible in the literature, estimates the ``value added'' by individual teachers to their students' current and future test scores by employing a mixed model with a longitudinal database of test scores. There is concern, however, that missing values that are common in the longitudinal student scores can bias value-added assessments, especially when the models serve as a basis for personnel decisions -- such as promoting or dismissing teachers -- as they are …

Contributors
Karl, Andrew Thomas, Lohr, Sharon L, Yang, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2012

The main objective of this research is to develop an approach to PV module lifetime prediction. In doing so, the aim is to move from empirical generalizations to a formal predictive science based on data-driven case studies of the crystalline silicon PV systems. The evaluation of PV systems aged 5 to 30 years old that results in systematic predictive capability that is absent today. The warranty period provided by the manufacturers typically range from 20 to 25 years for crystalline silicon modules. The end of lifetime (for example, the time-to-degrade by 20% from rated power) of PV modules is usually …

Contributors
Kuitche, Joseph Mathurin, Pan, Rong, TamizhMani, Govindasamy, et al.
Created Date
2014

Optimal experimental design for generalized linear models is often done using a pseudo-Bayesian approach that integrates the design criterion across a prior distribution on the parameter values. This approach ignores the lack of utility of certain models contained in the prior, and a case is demonstrated where the heavy focus on such hopeless models results in a design with poor performance and with wild swings in coverage probabilities for Wald-type confidence intervals. Design construction using a utility-based approach is shown to result in much more stable coverage probabilities in the area of greatest concern. The pseudo-Bayesian approach can be applied …

Contributors
Hassler, Edgar, Montgomery, Douglas C, Silvestrini, Rachel T, et al.
Created Date
2015

Mixture experiments are useful when the interest is in determining how changes in the proportion of an experimental component affects the response. This research focuses on the modeling and design of mixture experiments when the response is categorical namely, binary and ordinal. Data from mixture experiments is characterized by the perfect collinearity of the experimental components, resulting in model matrices that are singular and inestimable under likelihood estimation procedures. To alleviate problems with estimation, this research proposes the reparameterization of two nonlinear models for ordinal data -- the proportional-odds model with a logistic link and the stereotype model. A study …

Contributors
Mancenido, Michelle V., Montgomery, Douglas C, Pan, Rong, et al.
Created Date
2016

In accelerated life tests (ALTs), complete randomization is hardly achievable because of economic and engineering constraints. Typical experimental protocols such as subsampling or random blocks in ALTs result in a grouped structure, which leads to correlated lifetime observations. In this dissertation, generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) approach is proposed to analyze ALT data and find the optimal ALT design with the consideration of heterogeneous group effects. Two types of ALTs are demonstrated for data analysis. First, constant-stress ALT (CSALT) data with Weibull failure time distribution is modeled by GLMM. The marginal likelihood of observations is approximated by the quadrature rule; …

Contributors
Seo, Kangwon, Pan, Rong, Montgomery, Douglas C, et al.
Created Date
2017

In this era of fast computational machines and new optimization algorithms, there have been great advances in Experimental Designs. We focus our research on design issues in generalized linear models (GLMs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging(fMRI). The first part of our research is on tackling the challenging problem of constructing exact designs for GLMs, that are robust against parameter, link and model uncertainties by improving an existing algorithm and providing a new one, based on using a continuous particle swarm optimization (PSO) and spectral clustering. The proposed algorithm is sufficiently versatile to accomodate most popular design selection criteria, and we …

Contributors
Temkit, M'Hamed, Kao, Jason, Reiser, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2014

In mixture-process variable experiments, it is common that the number of runs is greater than in mixture-only or process-variable experiments. These experiments have to estimate the parameters from the mixture components, process variables, and interactions of both variables. In some of these experiments there are variables that are hard to change or cannot be controlled under normal operating conditions. These situations often prohibit a complete randomization for the experimental runs due to practical and economical considerations. Furthermore, the process variables can be categorized into two types: variables that are controllable and directly affect the response, and variables that are uncontrollable …

Contributors
Cho, Tae-Yeon, Montgomery, Douglas C, Borror, Connie M, et al.
Created Date
2010

The majority of research in experimental design has, to date, been focused on designs when there is only one type of response variable under consideration. In a decision-making process, however, relying on only one objective or criterion can lead to oversimplified, sub-optimal decisions that ignore important considerations. Incorporating multiple, and likely competing, objectives is critical during the decision-making process in order to balance the tradeoffs of all potential solutions. Consequently, the problem of constructing a design for an experiment when multiple types of responses are of interest does not have a clear answer, particularly when the response variables have different …

Contributors
Burke, Sarah Ellen, Montgomery, Douglas C, Borror, Connie M, et al.
Created Date
2016

Functional or dynamic responses are prevalent in experiments in the fields of engineering, medicine, and the sciences, but proposals for optimal designs are still sparse for this type of response. Experiments with dynamic responses result in multiple responses taken over a spectrum variable, so the design matrix for a dynamic response have more complicated structures. In the literature, the optimal design problem for some functional responses has been solved using genetic algorithm (GA) and approximate design methods. The goal of this dissertation is to develop fast computer algorithms for calculating exact D-optimal designs. First, we demonstrated how the traditional exchange …

Contributors
Saleh, Moein, Pan, Rong, Montgomery, Douglas C, et al.
Created Date
2015

Public health surveillance is a special case of the general problem where counts (or rates) of events are monitored for changes. Modern data complements event counts with many additional measurements (such as geographic, demographic, and others) that comprise high-dimensional covariates. This leads to an important challenge to detect a change that only occurs within a region, initially unspecified, defined by these covariates. Current methods are typically limited to spatial and/or temporal covariate information and often fail to use all the information available in modern data that can be paramount in unveiling these subtle changes. Additional complexities associated with modern health …

Contributors
Davila, Saylisse, Runger, George C, Montgomery, Douglas C, et al.
Created Date
2010