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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


This work presents two complementary studies that propose heuristic methods to capture characteristics of data using the ensemble learning method of random forest. The first study is motivated by the problem in education of determining teacher effectiveness in student achievement. Value-added models (VAMs), constructed as linear mixed models, use students’ test scores as outcome variables and teachers’ contributions as random effects to ascribe changes in student performance to the teachers who have taught them. The VAMs teacher score is the empirical best linear unbiased predictor (EBLUP). This approach is limited by the adequacy of the assumed model specification with respect …

Contributors
Valdivia, Arturo, Eubank, Randall, Young, Dennis, et al.
Created Date
2013

Correlation is common in many types of data, including those collected through longitudinal studies or in a hierarchical structure. In the case of clustering, or repeated measurements, there is inherent correlation between observations within the same group, or between observations obtained on the same subject. Longitudinal studies also introduce association between the covariates and the outcomes across time. When multiple outcomes are of interest, association may exist between the various models. These correlations can lead to issues in model fitting and inference if not properly accounted for. This dissertation presents three papers discussing appropriate methods to properly consider different types …

Contributors
Irimata, Kyle, Wilson, Jeffrey R, Broatch, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2018