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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


Methods to test hypotheses of mediated effects in the pretest-posttest control group design are understudied in the behavioral sciences (MacKinnon, 2008). Because many studies aim to answer questions about mediating processes in the pretest-posttest control group design, there is a need to determine which model is most appropriate to test hypotheses about mediating processes and what happens to estimates of the mediated effect when model assumptions are violated in this design. The goal of this project was to outline estimator characteristics of four longitudinal mediation models and the cross-sectional mediation model. Models were compared on type 1 error rates, statistical …

Contributors
Valente, Matthew, MacKinnon, David, West, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2015

A simulation study was conducted to explore the influence of partial loading invariance and partial intercept invariance on the latent mean comparison of the second-order factor within a higher-order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) model. Noninvariant loadings or intercepts were generated to be at one of the two levels or both levels for a second-order CFA model. The numbers and directions of differences in noninvariant loadings or intercepts were also manipulated, along with total sample size and effect size of the second-order factor mean difference. Data were analyzed using correct and incorrect specifications of noninvariant loadings and intercepts. Results summarized across …

Contributors
Liu, Yixing, Thompson, Marilyn, Green, Samuel, et al.
Created Date
2016

Although the issue of factorial invariance has received increasing attention in the literature, the focus is typically on differences in factor structure across groups that are directly observed, such as those denoted by sex or ethnicity. While establishing factorial invariance across observed groups is a requisite step in making meaningful cross-group comparisons, failure to attend to possible sources of latent class heterogeneity in the form of class-based differences in factor structure has the potential to compromise conclusions with respect to observed groups and may result in misguided attempts at instrument development and theory refinement. The present studies examined the sensitivity …

Contributors
Blackwell, Kimberly Carol, Millsap, Roger E, Aiken, Leona S, et al.
Created Date
2011

Traditional usability methods in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) have been extensively used to understand the usability of products. Measurements of user experience (UX) in traditional HCI studies mostly rely on task performance and observable user interactions with the product or services, such as usability tests, contextual inquiry, and subjective self-report data, including questionnaires, interviews, and usability tests. However, these studies fail to directly reflect a user’s psychological involvement and further fail to explain the cognitive processing and the related emotional arousal. Thus, capturing how users think and feel when they are using a product remains a vital challenge of user experience …

Contributors
Kula, Irfan, Atkinson, Robert K, Roscoe, Rod D, et al.
Created Date
2018

Though the likelihood is a useful tool for obtaining estimates of regression parameters, it is not readily available in the fit of hierarchical binary data models. The correlated observations negate the opportunity to have a joint likelihood when fitting hierarchical logistic regression models. Through conditional likelihood, inferences for the regression and covariance parameters as well as the intraclass correlation coefficients are usually obtained. In those cases, I have resorted to use of Laplace approximation and large sample theory approach for point and interval estimates such as Wald-type confidence intervals and profile likelihood confidence intervals. These methods rely on distributional assumptions …

Contributors
Wang, Bei, Wilson, Jeffrey R, Kamarianakis, Ioannis, et al.
Created Date
2017

Correlation is common in many types of data, including those collected through longitudinal studies or in a hierarchical structure. In the case of clustering, or repeated measurements, there is inherent correlation between observations within the same group, or between observations obtained on the same subject. Longitudinal studies also introduce association between the covariates and the outcomes across time. When multiple outcomes are of interest, association may exist between the various models. These correlations can lead to issues in model fitting and inference if not properly accounted for. This dissertation presents three papers discussing appropriate methods to properly consider different types …

Contributors
Irimata, Kyle, Wilson, Jeffrey R, Broatch, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2018

The primary objective in time series analysis is forecasting. Raw data often exhibits nonstationary behavior: trends, seasonal cycles, and heteroskedasticity. After data is transformed to a weakly stationary process, autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models may capture the remaining temporal dynamics to improve forecasting. Estimation of ARMA can be performed through regressing current values on previous realizations and proxy innovations. The classic paradigm fails when dynamics are nonlinear; in this case, parametric, regime-switching specifications model changes in level, ARMA dynamics, and volatility, using a finite number of latent states. If the states can be identified using past endogenous or exogenous information, …

Contributors
Giacomazzo, Mario, Kamarianakis, Yiannis, Reiser, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2018

Currently, there is a clear gap in the missing data literature for three-level models. To date, the literature has only focused on the theoretical and algorithmic work required to implement three-level imputation using the joint model (JM) method of imputation, leaving relatively no work done on fully conditional specication (FCS) method. Moreover, the literature lacks any methodological evaluation of three-level imputation. Thus, this thesis serves two purposes: (1) to develop an algorithm in order to implement FCS in the context of a three-level model and (2) to evaluate both imputation methods. The simulation investigated a random intercept model under both …

Contributors
Keller, Brian Tinnell, Enders, Craig K, Grimm, Kevin J, et al.
Created Date
2015

Threshold regression is used to model regime switching dynamics where the effects of the explanatory variables in predicting the response variable depend on whether a certain threshold has been crossed. When regime-switching dynamics are present, new estimation problems arise related to estimating the value of the threshold. Conventional methods utilize an iterative search procedure, seeking to minimize the sum of squares criterion. However, when unnecessary variables are included in the model or certain variables drop out of the model depending on the regime, this method may have high variability. This paper proposes Lasso-type methods as an alternative to ordinary least …

Contributors
van Schaijik, Maria, Kamarianakis, Yiannis, Kamarianakis, Yiannis, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation carries out an inter-disciplinary research of operations research, statistics, power system engineering, and economics. Specifically, this dissertation focuses on a special power system scheduling problem, a unit commitment problem with uncertainty. This scheduling problem is a two-stage decision problem. In the first stage, system operator determines the binary commitment status (on or off) of generators in advance. In the second stage, after the realization of uncertainty, the system operator determines generation levels of the generators. The goal of this dissertation is to develop computationally-tractable methodologies and algorithms to solve large-scale unit commitment problems with uncertainty. In the first …

Contributors
Li, Chao, Hedman, Kory W, Zhang, Muhong, et al.
Created Date
2016