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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


Information divergence functions, such as the Kullback-Leibler divergence or the Hellinger distance, play a critical role in statistical signal processing and information theory; however estimating them can be challenge. Most often, parametric assumptions are made about the two distributions to estimate the divergence of interest. In cases where no parametric model fits the data, non-parametric density estimation is used. In statistical signal processing applications, Gaussianity is usually assumed since closed-form expressions for common divergence measures have been derived for this family of distributions. Parametric assumptions are preferred when it is known that the data follows the model, however this is …

Contributors
Wisler, Alan, Berisha, Visar, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2017

Technological advances have enabled the generation and collection of various data from complex systems, thus, creating ample opportunity to integrate knowledge in many decision making applications. This dissertation introduces holistic learning as the integration of a comprehensive set of relationships that are used towards the learning objective. The holistic view of the problem allows for richer learning from data and, thereby, improves decision making. The first topic of this dissertation is the prediction of several target attributes using a common set of predictor attributes. In a holistic learning approach, the relationships between target attributes are embedded into the learning algorithm …

Contributors
Azarnoush, Bahareh, Runger, George C, Bekki, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2014

The inherent intermittency in solar energy resources poses challenges to scheduling generation, transmission, and distribution systems. Energy storage devices are often used to mitigate variability in renewable asset generation and provide a mechanism to shift renewable power between periods of the day. In the absence of storage, however, time series forecasting techniques can be used to estimate future solar resource availability to improve the accuracy of solar generator scheduling. The knowledge of future solar availability helps scheduling solar generation at high-penetration levels, and assists with the selection and scheduling of spinning reserves. This study employs statistical techniques to improve the …

Contributors
Soundiah Regunathan Rajasekaran, Dhiwaakar Purusothaman, Johnson, Nathan G, Karady, George G, et al.
Created Date
2016

The use of bias indicators in psychological measurement has been contentious, with some researchers questioning whether they actually suppress or moderate the ability of substantive psychological indictors to discriminate (McGrath, Mitchell, Kim, & Hough, 2010). Bias indicators on the MMPI-2-RF (F-r, Fs, FBS-r, K-r, and L-r) were tested for suppression or moderation of the ability of the RC1 and NUC scales to discriminate between Epileptic Seizures (ES) and Non-epileptic Seizures (NES, a conversion disorder that is often misdiagnosed as ES). RC1 and NUC had previously been found to be the best scales on the MMPI-2-RF to differentiate between ES and …

Contributors
Wershba, Rebecca Eve, Lanyon, Richard I, Barrera, Manuel, et al.
Created Date
2013

Researchers are often interested in estimating interactions in multilevel models, but many researchers assume that the same procedures and interpretations for interactions in single-level models apply to multilevel models. However, estimating interactions in multilevel models is much more complex than in single-level models. Because uncentered (RAS) or grand mean centered (CGM) level-1 predictors in two-level models contain two sources of variability (i.e., within-cluster variability and between-cluster variability), interactions involving RAS or CGM level-1 predictors also contain more than one source of variability. In this Master’s thesis, I use simulations to demonstrate that ignoring the four sources of variability in a …

Contributors
Mazza, Gina Lynn, Enders, Craig K., Aiken, Leona S., et al.
Created Date
2015

In the study of regional economic growth and convergence, the distribution dynamics approach which interrogates the evolution of the cross-sectional distribution as a whole and is concerned with both the external and internal dynamics of the distribution has received wide usage. However, many methodological issues remain to be resolved before valid inferences and conclusions can be drawn from empirical research. Among them, spatial effects including spatial heterogeneity and spatial dependence invalidate the assumption of independent and identical distributions underlying the conventional maximum likelihood techniques while the availability of small samples in regional settings questions the usage of the asymptotic properties. …

Contributors
KANG, WEI, Rey, Sergio, Fotheringham, Stewart, et al.
Created Date
2018

With the increase in computing power and availability of data, there has never been a greater need to understand data and make decisions from it. Traditional statistical techniques may not be adequate to handle the size of today's data or the complexities of the information hidden within the data. Thus knowledge discovery by machine learning techniques is necessary if we want to better understand information from data. In this dissertation, we explore the topics of asymmetric loss and asymmetric data in machine learning and propose new algorithms as solutions to some of the problems in these topics. We also studied …

Contributors
Koh, Derek, Runger, George, Wu, Tong, et al.
Created Date
2013

Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) are widely used for modeling responses with non-normal error distributions. When the values of the covariates in such models are controllable, finding an optimal (or at least efficient) design could greatly facilitate the work of collecting and analyzing data. In fact, many theoretical results are obtained on a case-by-case basis, while in other situations, researchers also rely heavily on computational tools for design selection. Three topics are investigated in this dissertation with each one focusing on one type of GLMs. Topic I considers GLMs with factorial effects and one continuous covariate. Factors can have interactions among …

Contributors
Wang, Zhongshen, Stufken, John, Kamarianakis, Ioannis, et al.
Created Date
2018

The recent technological advances enable the collection of various complex, heterogeneous and high-dimensional data in biomedical domains. The increasing availability of the high-dimensional biomedical data creates the needs of new machine learning models for effective data analysis and knowledge discovery. This dissertation introduces several unsupervised and supervised methods to help understand the data, discover the patterns and improve the decision making. All the proposed methods can generalize to other industrial fields. The first topic of this dissertation focuses on the data clustering. Data clustering is often the first step for analyzing a dataset without the label information. Clustering high-dimensional data …

Contributors
Lin, Sangdi, Runger, George C, Kocher, Jean-Pierre A, et al.
Created Date
2018

Predicting resistant prostate cancer is critical for lowering medical costs and improving the quality of life of advanced prostate cancer patients. I formulate, compare, and analyze two mathematical models that aim to forecast future levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). I accomplish these tasks by employing clinical data of locally advanced prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). I demonstrate that the inverse problem of parameter estimation might be too complicated and simply relying on data fitting can give incorrect conclusions, since there is a large error in parameter values estimated and parameters might be unidentifiable. I provide confidence intervals …

Contributors
Baez, Javier, Kuang, Yang, Kostelich, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2017