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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


Extraordinary medical advances have led to significant reductions in the burden of infectious diseases in humans. However, infectious diseases still account for more than 13 million annual deaths. This large burden is partly due to some pathogens having found suitable conditions to emerge and spread in denser and more connected host populations, and others having evolved to escape the pressures imposed by the rampant use of antimicrobials. It is then critical to improve our understanding of how diseases spread in these modern landscapes, characterized by new host population structures and socio-economic environments, as well as containment measures such as the …

Contributors
Patterson-Lomba, Oscar, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, Towers, Sherry, et al.
Created Date
2014

The majority of research in experimental design has, to date, been focused on designs when there is only one type of response variable under consideration. In a decision-making process, however, relying on only one objective or criterion can lead to oversimplified, sub-optimal decisions that ignore important considerations. Incorporating multiple, and likely competing, objectives is critical during the decision-making process in order to balance the tradeoffs of all potential solutions. Consequently, the problem of constructing a design for an experiment when multiple types of responses are of interest does not have a clear answer, particularly when the response variables have different …

Contributors
Burke, Sarah Ellen, Montgomery, Douglas C, Borror, Connie M, et al.
Created Date
2016

Functional or dynamic responses are prevalent in experiments in the fields of engineering, medicine, and the sciences, but proposals for optimal designs are still sparse for this type of response. Experiments with dynamic responses result in multiple responses taken over a spectrum variable, so the design matrix for a dynamic response have more complicated structures. In the literature, the optimal design problem for some functional responses has been solved using genetic algorithm (GA) and approximate design methods. The goal of this dissertation is to develop fast computer algorithms for calculating exact D-optimal designs. First, we demonstrated how the traditional exchange …

Contributors
Saleh, Moein, Pan, Rong, Montgomery, Douglas C, et al.
Created Date
2015

Nowadays product reliability becomes the top concern of the manufacturers and customers always prefer the products with good performances under long period. In order to estimate the lifetime of the product, accelerated life testing (ALT) is introduced because most of the products can last years even decades. Much research has been done in the ALT area and optimal design for ALT is a major topic. This dissertation consists of three main studies. First, a methodology of finding optimal design for ALT with right censoring and interval censoring have been developed and it employs the proportional hazard (PH) model and generalized …

Contributors
Yang, Tao, Pan, Rong, Montgomery, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2013

This study concerns optimal designs for experiments where responses consist of both binary and continuous variables. Many experiments in engineering, medical studies, and other fields have such mixed responses. Although in recent decades several statistical methods have been developed for jointly modeling both types of response variables, an effective way to design such experiments remains unclear. To address this void, some useful results are developed to guide the selection of optimal experimental designs in such studies. The results are mainly built upon a powerful tool called the complete class approach and a nonlinear optimization algorithm. The complete class approach was …

Contributors
Kim, Soohyun, Kao, Ming-Hung, Dueck, Amylou, et al.
Created Date
2017

This is a two-part thesis: Part 1 characterizes soiling losses using various techniques to understand the effect of soiling on photovoltaic modules. The higher the angle of incidence (AOI), the lower will be the photovoltaic (PV) module performance. Our research group has already reported the AOI investigation for cleaned modules of five different technologies with air/glass interface. However, the modules that are installed in the field would invariably develop a soil layer with varying thickness depending on the site condition, rainfall and tilt angle. The soiled module will have the air/soil/glass interface rather than air/glass interface. This study investigates the …

Contributors
Boppana, Sravanthi, Tamizhmani, Govindasamy, Srinivasan, Devarajan, et al.
Created Date
2015

The Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is primarily endemic in five countries, with India and Sudan having the highest burden. The risk factors associated with VL are either unknown in some regions or vary drastically among empirical studies. Here, a dynamical model, motivated and informed by field data from the literature, is analyzed and employed to identify and quantify the impact of region dependent risks on the VL transmission dynamics. Parameter estimation procedures were developed using model-derived quantities and empirical data from multiple resources. The dynamics of VL depend on the estimates of the control reproductive number, RC, interpreted as the average …

Contributors
Barley, Kamal Kevin, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, Mubayi, Anuj, et al.
Created Date
2016

The comparison of between- versus within-person relations addresses a central issue in psychological research regarding whether group-level relations among variables generalize to individual group members. Between- and within-person effects may differ in magnitude as well as direction, and contextual multilevel models can accommodate this difference. Contextual multilevel models have been explicated mostly for cross-sectional data, but they can also be applied to longitudinal data where level-1 effects represent within-person relations and level-2 effects represent between-person relations. With longitudinal data, estimating the contextual effect allows direct evaluation of whether between-person and within-person effects differ. Furthermore, these models, unlike single-level models, permit …

Contributors
Wurpts, Ingrid Carlson, MacKinnon, David P, West, Stephen G, et al.
Created Date
2016

Distributed Renewable energy generators are now contributing a significant amount of energy into the energy grid. Consequently, reliability adequacy of such energy generators will depend on making accurate forecasts of energy produced by them. Power outputs of Solar PV systems depend on the stochastic variation of environmental factors (solar irradiance, ambient temperature & wind speed) and random mechanical failures/repairs. Monte Carlo Simulation which is typically used to model such problems becomes too computationally intensive leading to simplifying state-space assumptions. Multi-state models for power system reliability offer a higher flexibility in providing a description of system state evolution and an accurate …

Contributors
Kadloor, Nikhil, Kuitche, Joseph, Pan, Rong, et al.
Created Date
2017

A major challenge in health-related policy and program evaluation research is attributing underlying causal relationships where complicated processes may exist in natural or quasi-experimental settings. Spatial interaction and heterogeneity between units at individual or group levels can violate both components of the Stable-Unit-Treatment-Value-Assumption (SUTVA) that are core to the counterfactual framework, making treatment effects difficult to assess. New approaches are needed in health studies to develop spatially dynamic causal modeling methods to both derive insights from data that are sensitive to spatial differences and dependencies, and also be able to rely on a more robust, dynamic technical infrastructure needed for …

Contributors
Kolak, Marynia Aniela, Anselin, Luc, Rey, Sergio, et al.
Created Date
2017