Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


This work presents two complementary studies that propose heuristic methods to capture characteristics of data using the ensemble learning method of random forest. The first study is motivated by the problem in education of determining teacher effectiveness in student achievement. Value-added models (VAMs), constructed as linear mixed models, use students’ test scores as outcome variables and teachers’ contributions as random effects to ascribe changes in student performance to the teachers who have taught them. The VAMs teacher score is the empirical best linear unbiased predictor (EBLUP). This approach is limited by the adequacy of the assumed model specification with respect …

Contributors
Valdivia, Arturo, Eubank, Randall, Young, Dennis, et al.
Created Date
2013

The recent technological advances enable the collection of various complex, heterogeneous and high-dimensional data in biomedical domains. The increasing availability of the high-dimensional biomedical data creates the needs of new machine learning models for effective data analysis and knowledge discovery. This dissertation introduces several unsupervised and supervised methods to help understand the data, discover the patterns and improve the decision making. All the proposed methods can generalize to other industrial fields. The first topic of this dissertation focuses on the data clustering. Data clustering is often the first step for analyzing a dataset without the label information. Clustering high-dimensional data …

Contributors
Lin, Sangdi, Runger, George C, Kocher, Jean-Pierre A, et al.
Created Date
2018

Public health surveillance is a special case of the general problem where counts (or rates) of events are monitored for changes. Modern data complements event counts with many additional measurements (such as geographic, demographic, and others) that comprise high-dimensional covariates. This leads to an important challenge to detect a change that only occurs within a region, initially unspecified, defined by these covariates. Current methods are typically limited to spatial and/or temporal covariate information and often fail to use all the information available in modern data that can be paramount in unveiling these subtle changes. Additional complexities associated with modern health …

Contributors
Davila, Saylisse, Runger, George C, Montgomery, Douglas C, et al.
Created Date
2010

Sparse learning is a technique in machine learning for feature selection and dimensionality reduction, to find a sparse set of the most relevant features. In any machine learning problem, there is a considerable amount of irrelevant information, and separating relevant information from the irrelevant information has been a topic of focus. In supervised learning like regression, the data consists of many features and only a subset of the features may be responsible for the result. Also, the features might require special structural requirements, which introduces additional complexity for feature selection. The sparse learning package, provides a set of algorithms for …

Contributors
Thulasiram, Ramesh L., Ye, Jieping, Xue, Guoliang, et al.
Created Date
2011