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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Masters Thesis
  • 1 Text
Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Dimensionality assessment is an important component of evaluating item response data. Existing approaches to evaluating common assumptions of unidimensionality, such as DIMTEST (Nandakumar & Stout, 1993; Stout, 1987; Stout, Froelich, & Gao, 2001), have been shown to work well under large-scale assessment conditions (e.g., large sample sizes and item pools; see e.g., Froelich & Habing, 2007). It remains to be seen how such procedures perform in the context of small-scale assessments characterized by relatively small sample sizes and/or short tests. The fact that some procedures come with minimum allowable values for characteristics of the data, such as the number of …

Contributors
Reichenberg, Ray E., Levy, Roy, Thompson, Marilyn S., et al.
Created Date
2013

Understanding customer preference is crucial for new product planning and marketing decisions. This thesis explores how historical data can be leveraged to understand and predict customer preference. This thesis presents a decision support framework that provides a holistic view on customer preference by following a two-phase procedure. Phase-1 uses cluster analysis to create product profiles based on which customer profiles are derived. Phase-2 then delves deep into each of the customer profiles and investigates causality behind their preference using Bayesian networks. This thesis illustrates the working of the framework using the case of Intel Corporation, world’s largest semiconductor manufacturing company. …

Contributors
Ram, Sudarshan Venkat, Kempf, Karl G, Wu, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2017

Bayesian Additive Regression Trees (BART) is a non-parametric Bayesian model that often outperforms other popular predictive models in terms of out-of-sample error. This thesis studies a modified version of BART called Accelerated Bayesian Additive Regression Trees (XBART). The study consists of simulation and real data experiments comparing XBART to other leading algorithms, including BART. The results show that XBART maintains BART’s predictive power while reducing its computation time. The thesis also describes the development of a Python package implementing XBART. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Yalov, Saar, Hahn, P. Richard, McCulloch, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2019

Real-world environments are characterized by non-stationary and continuously evolving data. Learning a classification model on this data would require a framework that is able to adapt itself to newer circumstances. Under such circumstances, transfer learning has come to be a dependable methodology for improving classification performance with reduced training costs and without the need for explicit relearning from scratch. In this thesis, a novel instance transfer technique that adapts a "Cost-sensitive" variation of AdaBoost is presented. The method capitalizes on the theoretical and functional properties of AdaBoost to selectively reuse outdated training instances obtained from a "source" domain to effectively …

Contributors
Venkatesan, Ashok, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2011

This thesis presents a family of adaptive curvature methods for gradient-based stochastic optimization. In particular, a general algorithmic framework is introduced along with a practical implementation that yields an efficient, adaptive curvature gradient descent algorithm. To this end, a theoretical and practical link between curvature matrix estimation and shrinkage methods for covariance matrices is established. The use of shrinkage improves estimation accuracy of the curvature matrix when data samples are scarce. This thesis also introduce several insights that result in data- and computation-efficient update equations. Empirical results suggest that the proposed method compares favorably with existing second-order techniques based on …

Contributors
Barron, Trevor Paul, Ben Amor, Heni, He, Jingrui, et al.
Created Date
2019

This article proposes a new information-based subdata selection (IBOSS) algorithm, Squared Scaled Distance Algorithm (SSDA). It is based on the invariance of the determinant of the information matrix under orthogonal transformations, especially rotations. Extensive simulation results show that the new IBOSS algorithm retains nice asymptotic properties of IBOSS and gives a larger determinant of the subdata information matrix. It has the same order of time complexity as the D-optimal IBOSS algorithm. However, it exploits the advantages of vectorized calculation avoiding for loops and is approximately 6 times as fast as the D-optimal IBOSS algorithm in R. The robustness of SSDA …

Contributors
Zheng, Yi, Stufken, John, Reiser, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2017

Anomaly is a deviation from the normal behavior of the system and anomaly detection techniques try to identify unusual instances based on deviation from the normal data. In this work, I propose a machine-learning algorithm, referred to as Artificial Contrasts, for anomaly detection in categorical data in which neither the dimension, the specific attributes involved, nor the form of the pattern is known a priori. I use RandomForest (RF) technique as an effective learner for artificial contrast. RF is a powerful algorithm that can handle relations of attributes in high dimensional data and detect anomalies while providing probability estimates for …

Contributors
Mousavi, Seyyedehnasim, Runger, George, Wu, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2016

This thesis presents a meta-analysis of lead-free solder reliability. The qualitative analyses of the failure modes of lead- free solder under different stress tests including drop test, bend test, thermal test and vibration test are discussed. The main cause of failure of lead- free solder is fatigue crack, and the speed of propagation of the initial crack could differ from different test conditions and different solder materials. A quantitative analysis about the fatigue behavior of SAC lead-free solder under thermal preconditioning process is conducted. This thesis presents a method of making prediction of failure life of solder alloy by building …

Contributors
Xu, Xinyue, Pan, Rong, Montgomery, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2014

In this work, I present a Bayesian inference computational framework for the analysis of widefield microscopy data that addresses three challenges: (1) counting and localizing stationary fluorescent molecules; (2) inferring a spatially-dependent effective fluorescence profile that describes the spatially-varying rate at which fluorescent molecules emit subsequently-detected photons (due to different illumination intensities or different local environments); and (3) inferring the camera gain. My general theoretical framework utilizes the Bayesian nonparametric Gaussian and beta-Bernoulli processes with a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, which I further specify and implement for Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy data, benchmarking the method on …

Contributors
Wallgren, Ross Tod, Presse, Steve, Armbruster, Hans, et al.
Created Date
2019

This thesis examines the application of statistical signal processing approaches to data arising from surveys intended to measure psychological and sociological phenomena underpinning human social dynamics. The use of signal processing methods for analysis of signals arising from measurement of social, biological, and other non-traditional phenomena has been an important and growing area of signal processing research over the past decade. Here, we explore the application of statistical modeling and signal processing concepts to data obtained from the Global Group Relations Project, specifically to understand and quantify the effects and interactions of social psychological factors related to intergroup conflicts. We …

Contributors
Liu, Hui, Taylor, Thomas, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2012