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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2019


College weight gain and obesity are significant problems impacting our society, leading to a considerable number of comorbidities during and after college. Gut microbiota are increasingly recognized for their role in obesity and weight gain. Currently, research exploring the gut microbiome and its associations with dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) is limited among this population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess associations between the gut microbiome, BMI, and dietary intake in a population of healthy college students living in two dorms at Arizona State University (n=90). Cross-sectional analyses were undertaken including 24-hour dietary recalls and …

Contributors
Hotz, Ricci-Lee, Whisner, Corrie, Bruening, Meredith, et al.
Created Date
2016

There is limited research on bullying among college students and even less research on hazing behaviors among students who are in a campus organization. Previously used scales were created for use with children and were not behavior specific, leaving out adult experiences college students may encounter and asking about bullying in general which leaves the definition up to the responder. This study aimed to create an instrument that examines behavior specific experiences with college students and their peers, in the general college setting and specific to a campus organization they belong to. Five hundred and two undergraduate students completed surveys …

Contributors
Dimberg, Sierra Kelsey, Tracey, Terence, Kochenderfer-Ladd, Becky, et al.
Created Date
2016

Being married as an undergraduate student is uncommon, considering the average age people marry in the U.S. is 28-years-old. Given that the “traditional” undergraduate student is unmarried, being a married undergraduate student may be associated with the anticipation of stigma due to their marital status, which may be a stressful experience (hereafter-anticipated stigma stress) and have harmful effects on one’s well-being, particularly symptoms of anxiety. As such, it is important to identify ways in which romantic partners can help one another cope with this unique stressor by engaging in positive or negative dyadic coping (DC). Using cross-sectional data from 151 …

Contributors
Messerschmitt, Shelby, Randall, Ashley K, Pereira, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2017

A record number of Latino students are enrolling in higher education in the U.S., but as a group Latinos are the least likely to complete a bachelor’s degree. Cultural factors theoretically contribute to Latino students’ success, including orientation toward ethnic heritage and mainstream cultures (i.e., dual cultural adaptation), feeling comfortable navigating two cultural contexts (i.e., biculturalism), and the degree of fit between students’ cultural backgrounds and the cultural landscapes of educational institutions (i.e., cultural congruity). In a two-part study, these cultural factors were examined in relation to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress response (indexed by salivary cortisol), a physiological mechanism …

Contributors
Sladek, Michael R., Doane, Leah D, Gonzales, Nancy A, et al.
Created Date
2018

This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n=10) and in a typical college population (n=37). The use of EDA allowed for trends to emerge from the data and provided a foundation for future research in the areas of biofeedback and accommodations for college students with ASD. Comparing the first five weeks of the study with the second five weeks of the 10 week study, both groups showed improvement in their control of heart rate variability, a physiological …

Contributors
Westlake, Garret Mac, Mccoy, Kathleen M, Brown, Jane T, et al.
Created Date
2013

Daily life stressors and negative emotional experiences predict poor physical and psychological health. The stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is a primary biological system through which stressful experiences impact health and well-being across development. Individuals differ in their capacity for self-regulation and utilize various coping strategies in response to stress. Everyday experiences and emotions are highly variable during adolescence, a time during which self-regulatory abilities may become particularly important for adapting to shifting social contexts. Many adolescents in the U.S. enter college after high school, a context characterized by new opportunities and challenges for self-regulation. Guided by biopsychosocial and …

Contributors
Sladek, Michael R., Doane, Leah D, Eisenberg, Nancy, et al.
Created Date
2015

It’s Not That Simple: A Complex Journey of an MFA Applied Project discusses the experience of graduate student, Molly W. Schenck. Schenck’s applied project, It’s Not That Simple, was an interdisciplinary dance theatre performance piece that challenges rape culture on college campuses. While the focus of the applied project was this performance, it was the obstacles and highlights that were related to the project that made the journey memorable. This paper will discuss the history and evolution of It’s Not That Simple, the creative process, the research, the trajectory of the project, and reflections on the journey. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Schenck, Molly Winetrout, Schupp, Karen, Kaplan, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2016

Literature reviews, books, and research studies are reviewed in this thesis with the purpose of examining the postsecondary transition of young adults on the autism spectrum (AS). Previous research on the specific social, legislative, victimization, and self-determination issues that young adults on the AS face during their postsecondary transition process is extensively examined as well as research that addresses the viewpoints of postsecondary programs from the perspectives of caregivers and young adults. Research studies and literature reviews that address current postsecondary programs for those on the AS and current adult outcomes for those on the AS are also included in …

Contributors
Hanish, Maxwell, Mccoy, Kathleeen M., Rader, Martha, et al.
Created Date
2011

There were two primary goals of this study, the first of which was to replicate previously established curvilinear associations between school affluence and substance use, while assessing potential relations between socioeconomic status (SES) and academic success during the transition to college. The second goal of this study was to establish patterns of perceived parenting factors in order to assess predictive value of such latent profiles with respect to student outcomes relevant to wellbeing and retention in college. Results indicated that substance use was, in fact, associated in a “U-shaped,” curvilinear fashion with high school affluence. Additionally, students grouped into three …

Contributors
Small, Phillip, Luthar, Suniya S, Infurna, Frank J, et al.
Created Date
2019

Objectives This cross-sectional study sought to assess the eating and physical activity behaviors among in-state and out-of-state college freshmen attending Arizona State University and to determine if social connectedness mediated the relationship between residency status and eating and physical activity behaviors. Methods College freshmen from two dormitories were recruited for participation from Arizona State University’s Tempe campus. A 128-item survey assessing demographics, college life, eating and physical activity behaviors, and social connectedness was administered. In addition, participants completed up to three days of dietary recall. Multivariate linear regression models, adjusting for age, gender, race, ethnicity, highest parental education, dormitory, Pell …

Contributors
Nelson, Stephanie Aleece, Bruening, Meg, Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam, et al.
Created Date
2016