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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Resource Type
  • Doctoral Dissertation
Date Range
2010 2018


Advances in the area of ubiquitous, pervasive and wearable computing have resulted in the development of low band-width, data rich environmental and body sensor networks, providing a reliable and non-intrusive methodology for capturing activity data from humans and the environments they inhabit. Assistive technologies that promote independent living amongst elderly and individuals with cognitive impairment are a major motivating factor for sensor-based activity recognition systems. However, the process of discerning relevant activity information from these sensor streams such as accelerometers is a non-trivial task and is an on-going research area. The difficulty stems from factors such as spatio-temporal variations in ...

Contributors
Chatapuram Krishnan, Narayanan, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Sundaram, Hari, et al.
Created Date
2010

In motor learning, real-time multi-modal feedback is a critical element in guided training. Serious games have been introduced as a platform for at-home motor training due to their highly interactive and multi-modal nature. This dissertation explores the design of a multimodal environment for at-home training in which an autonomous system observes and guides the user in the place of a live trainer, providing real-time assessment, feedback and difficulty adaptation as the subject masters a motor skill. After an in-depth review of the latest solutions in this field, this dissertation proposes a person-centric approach to the design of this environment, in ...

Contributors
Tadayon, Ramin, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, McDaniel, Troy, et al.
Created Date
2017

The rapid escalation of technology and the widespread emergence of modern technological equipments have resulted in the generation of humongous amounts of digital data (in the form of images, videos and text). This has expanded the possibility of solving real world problems using computational learning frameworks. However, while gathering a large amount of data is cheap and easy, annotating them with class labels is an expensive process in terms of time, labor and human expertise. This has paved the way for research in the field of active learning. Such algorithms automatically select the salient and exemplar instances from large quantities ...

Contributors
Chakraborty, Shayok, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Balasubramanian, Vineeth N., et al.
Created Date
2013

In recent years, machine learning and data mining technologies have received growing attention in several areas such as recommendation systems, natural language processing, speech and handwriting recognition, image processing and biomedical domain. Many of these applications which deal with physiological and biomedical data require person specific or person adaptive systems. The greatest challenge in developing such systems is the subject-dependent data variations or subject-based variability in physiological and biomedical data, which leads to difference in data distributions making the task of modeling these data, using traditional machine learning algorithms, complex and challenging. As a result, despite the wide application of ...

Contributors
Chattopadhyay, Rita, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Ye, Jieping, et al.
Created Date
2013

In UAVs and parking lots, it is typical to first collect an enormous number of pixels using conventional imagers. This is followed by employment of expensive methods to compress by throwing away redundant data. Subsequently, the compressed data is transmitted to a ground station. The past decade has seen the emergence of novel imagers called spatial-multiplexing cameras, which offer compression at the sensing level itself by providing an arbitrary linear measurements of the scene instead of pixel-based sampling. In this dissertation, I discuss various approaches for effective information extraction from spatial-multiplexing measurements and present the trade-offs between reliability of the ...

Contributors
Kulkarni, Kuldeep Sharad, Turaga, Pavan, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2017

The fields of pattern recognition and machine learning are on a fundamental quest to design systems that can learn the way humans do. One important aspect of human intelligence that has so far not been given sufficient attention is the capability of humans to express when they are certain about a decision, or when they are not. Machine learning techniques today are not yet fully equipped to be trusted with this critical task. This work seeks to address this fundamental knowledge gap. Existing approaches that provide a measure of confidence on a prediction such as learning algorithms based on the ...

Contributors
Nallure Balasubramanian, Vineeth, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Ye, Jieping, et al.
Created Date
2010

Deep learning architectures have been widely explored in computer vision and have depicted commendable performance in a variety of applications. A fundamental challenge in training deep networks is the requirement of large amounts of labeled training data. While gathering large quantities of unlabeled data is cheap and easy, annotating the data is an expensive process in terms of time, labor and human expertise. Thus, developing algorithms that minimize the human effort in training deep models is of immense practical importance. Active learning algorithms automatically identify salient and exemplar samples from large amounts of unlabeled data and can augment maximal information ...

Contributors
Ranganathan, Hiranmayi, Sethuraman, Panchanathan, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2018

Social Computing is an area of computer science concerned with dynamics of communities and cultures, created through computer-mediated social interaction. Various social media platforms, such as social network services and microblogging, enable users to come together and create social movements expressing their opinions on diverse sets of issues, events, complaints, grievances, and goals. Methods for monitoring and summarizing these types of sociopolitical trends, its leaders and followers, messages, and dynamics are needed. In this dissertation, a framework comprising of community and content-based computational methods is presented to provide insights for multilingual and noisy political social media content. First, a model ...

Contributors
Alzahrani, Sultan, Davulcu, Hasan, Corman, Steve R., et al.
Created Date
2018

The widespread adoption of computer vision models is often constrained by the issue of domain mismatch. Models that are trained with data belonging to one distribution, perform poorly when tested with data from a different distribution. Variations in vision based data can be attributed to the following reasons, viz., differences in image quality (resolution, brightness, occlusion and color), changes in camera perspective, dissimilar backgrounds and an inherent diversity of the samples themselves. Machine learning techniques like transfer learning are employed to adapt computational models across distributions. Domain adaptation is a special case of transfer learning, where knowledge from a source ...

Contributors
Demakethepalli Venkateswara, Hemanth, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2017

A statement appearing in social media provides a very significant challenge for determining the provenance of the statement. Provenance describes the origin, custody, and ownership of something. Most statements appearing in social media are not published with corresponding provenance data. However, the same characteristics that make the social media environment challenging, including the massive amounts of data available, large numbers of users, and a highly dynamic environment, provide unique and untapped opportunities for solving the provenance problem for social media. Current approaches for tracking provenance data do not scale for online social media and consequently there is a gap in ...

Contributors
Barbier, Geoffrey, Liu, Huan, Bell, Herbert, et al.
Created Date
2011