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Knowledge of undisclosed corporate authorship (“ghostwriting”) reduces the perceived credibility of antidepressant research: a randomized vignette study with experienced nurses


Abstract Background
There is much concern regarding undisclosed corporate authorship (“ghostwriting”) in the peer-reviewed medical literature. However, there are no studies of how disclosure of ghostwriting alone impacts the perceived credibility of research results.
Findings
We conducted a randomized vignette study with experienced nurses (n = 67), using a fictional study of antidepressant medication. The vignette described a randomized controlled trial and gave efficacy and adverse effect rates. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two authorship conditions, either (a) traditional authorship (n = 35) or (b) ghostwritten paper (n = 32), and then completed a perceived credibility scale. Our primary hypothesis was that the median perceived c... (more)
Created Date 2012-09-05
Contributor Lacasse, Jeffrey (ASU author) / Leo, Jonathan (Author) / Cimino, Andrea (ASU author) / Bean, Kristen (ASU author) / Del-Colle, Melissa (ASU author) / College of Public Service and Community Solutions / School of Social Work
Series BMC RESEARCH NOTES
Type Text
Extent 6 pages
Language English
Identifier DOI: 10.1186/1756-0500-5-490 / ISSN: 1756-0500
Rights
Citation Lacasse, J. R., Leo, J., Cimino, A. N., Bean, K. F., & Del-Colle, M. (2012). Knowledge of undisclosed corporate authorship ("ghostwriting") reduces the perceived credibility of antidepressant research: a randomized vignette study with experienced nurses. BMC Research Notes, 5(1), 490. doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-490
Note The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://bmcresnotes.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1756-0500-5-490
Collaborating Institutions ASU Library
Additional Formats MODS / OAI Dublin Core / RIS


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