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Self-efficacy and confidence: Theoretical distinctions and implications for trial consultation


Abstract Self-Efficacy Theory (SET; Bandura, 1986, 2000) has generated research and practice ramifications across areas of psychology. However, self-efficacy has yet to be assessed in a legal context. The present paper juxtaposes self-efficacy with self-confidence in terms of theoretical foundations and practical implications, with attention to the area of witness testimony. It is concluded that the concept of witness self-efficacy possesses thorough theoretical grounding as a potential target for witness preparation. As such, we put forth an integrated model of witness preparation featuring self-efficacy bolstering techniques within an established witness training framework.
Created Date 2009
Contributor Cramer, Robert J. / Neal, Tess M.S. / Brodsky, Stanley L.
Subject self-efficacy / confidence / witness / testimony / witness preparation
Type Text
Language English
Identifier DOI: 10.1037/a0017310
Rights All Rights Reserved
Citation Cramer, R.J., Neal, T.M.S., & Brodsky, S.L. (2009). Self-efficacy and confidence: Theoretical distinctions and implications for trial consultation. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 61, 319-334. DOI: 10.1037/a0017310
Collaborating Institutions New College of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences
Additional Formats MODS / OAI Dublin Core / RIS


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